Friday, 27 May 2016

The Road to Development

I read an article some weeks ago, which stated the highways ministry has built highways at the speed of 17 kms per day over the last year or so. It may look like a mere statistic to city slickers like us, but ask anyone living in the villages what it means, and he's likely to tell you that it could be the difference between abject poverty and a dignified existence.

I realised it from first hand experience about a decade ago, when I was on the way to Satna, from a client's plant. The driver- a native of the nearby village- told me that construction of the road on which we were driving was a Godsend for the village. The villagers were predominantly farmers for whom the road meant easy access to the town market. That was not possible until the construction of the road, which left them entirely at the mercy of middlemen. Apparently, the presence of that road had lifted the people of his village from utter poverty to a relatively comfortable existence in just a generation.

That obscure little village is a small place that's far too insignificant to merit so much as a dot on the map of India. Nevertheless, the story of that village could well be taken as a microcosm of rural India. The importance of a good road network cannot possibly be overstated or exaggerated.



Imagine a situation where your mother or your child has a medical emergency. What would you first do? Rush to the doctor's place, isn't it? Now imagine if that trip is on a kuchha road which is in such pathetic condition that you cannot possibly drive fast. We may have bad roads in our cities, but we have ambulances or at worst, cars as opposed to the open air tractors in which our rural compatriots have to travel. Goodness knows how many people have had their health irreparably damaged while being driven on bumpy roads and how many died because they could not get medical attention in time.

Besides, imagine the impact on the families of the affected. There is, for starters, the loss of a working member of the house or he/ she working at significantly diminished capacity. That in turn would impact the lives of the children- more so if the affected person happens to be the mother.

Another under appreciated aspect is a social one. There are school kids in some backward regions who miss out on school due to the absence of good roads. Even a few kilometres could be a huge distance to travel if there is no connecting road. If travelling the distance on a daily basis is daunting, dropouts/ non-enrollment could become common. As you can imagine, girl children would be the first to be affected. Godness knows how many talented people have been lost over the years due to the absence of good roads.



Construction of highways also opens up new avenues in the form of food courts and hotels along the route, which would not only benefit entrepreneurs, but also generate employment for the local populace. There is also the fact that highways give a boost to sectors like tourism and logistics, which in turn would generate demand for derivative services like banking and insurance. 

In short, the construction of highways has a multiplier effect on the economy. For every mile of excellent roads, there are scores of people whose lives have been profoundly changed for the better.

And so the next time you drive down the highway, just remember that it isn't merely a smooth road for your vehicle to ply on. It is the road to India's development.

This the updated version of an article of mine that appeared in the now defunct website thoughtsconnect.com in April 2012

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